Games are for life, not just for Christmas

These cd-rom boxes were destined for the recycling bin (or perhaps a bonfire?), but the generous owner instead called the NVA.

These cd-rom boxes were destined for the recycling bin (or perhaps a bonfire?), but the generous owner instead called the NVA.

It's a sad fact that this Christmas many people have unwrapped new videogames, new consoles, new controllers and been faced with the grim reality that there's simply not enough room for the older videogames in their life. 

Game-lovers will be forced to look upon their old collections and make choices that seem impossibly, cruelly hard.

We know that it's sometimes hard to justify keeping hold of yet another bespoke controller, another hardware platform, another game when the very real pressures of modern living can make space at a premium. 

This year, the National Videogame Arcade is here to help.  

Reuse, recycle, replay. 

Old games are sometimes preserved inside their original collecting cases. This one holds 'cassette tapes', a form of now obselete magnetic data storage . 

Old games are sometimes preserved inside their original collecting cases. This one holds 'cassette tapes', a form of now obselete magnetic data storage . 

We know that you don't want to simply throw these objects away. We know you loved them and don't want to betray that. 

That's why every year we focus on opening our doors to receiving the consoles and games that you no longer can care for, and put them to good use with new players.

Games you thought were destined to be packed away forever can make new faces smile.

 

Our donations programme helps keep the NVA stocked with videogames, brings new and interesting games (and their stories) to the public attention and often helps to save the domestic relationships of the donator. 

 

Whilst we can't condone piracy, we acknowledge it as a key part of videogame culture history. Sadly, in this example the lazy pirate didn't bother to draw a decent 'Horace' cover.  

Whilst we can't condone piracy, we acknowledge it as a key part of videogame culture history. Sadly, in this example the lazy pirate didn't bother to draw a decent 'Horace' cover.  

When you donate a videogame object to the NVA, you're paying that game forward to new audiences. We'd like to acknowledge your donation by thanking you publically, and also capture your history with the object when you do so. A few recollections, how you got it, why you love/hate it, how you feel giving it away... We want to know the human story behind it.  

 

The NVA will never turn its back on a videogame, because we know, just like you do, that they should be with us for life, not just Christmas.  

By giving your unwanted videogame objects to the NVA, we'll ensure that they play on. 

 

Check out our donations page for full details. 

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